Academic Proposals

A flattering discovery…

In scanning through my blog’s statistics just now I noticed a huge (well, relative for a small-scale, infrequently updated blog on teaching, technology, and history) spike in traffic last week on Dec. 4. Not thinking that anything particularly eventful had occurred that day in terms of my writing, I checked the stats and found a link to a very nice, detailed write-up on the ASCD blog by David Snyder. Snyder does a nice job of recapping a few of my posts and offering some insight as to why I’ve structured it in the way that I have. In particular I found this observation astute:

In a way that shows—rather than tells—teachers how to use new online tools, he embeds the assignment document into his blog, using the versatile publishing tools of Scribd.

That (the showing, not telling) is certainly what I strive to do not only in my online writing, but also in my daily teaching, though it is a challenging task. So, thanks again, David, for the write-up! I’m glad to know that my musings are being received positively.

Oh, and on one other exciting note related to education and technology, I learned yesterday that the proposal Vanessa Scanfeld and I submitted for a session on MixedInk at ISTE 2010 in Denver, CO, was accepted! Moreover, it apparently was accepted in one of the more competitive categories of “Bring Your Own Laptop” — only a 29% acceptance rate. Perhaps this will also bear some future blog post.

Okay, now back to the final paper writing…really.

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One thought on “A flattering discovery…

  1. pjhiggins says:

    I have to say that is what led me here. Great stuff here; I’ll be sure to pass along to my colleagues.

    Alan November has long been touting the idea that we should have our students create entries for local historical landmarks or other oddities in our towns right in wikipedia. That way they can experience the vetting process that occurs behind the scenes. If they are going to use it, they may as well understand what happens when you try to falsely edit an entry.

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